Service intervals - Suzuki Van Van 200 Forum
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  • 2 Post By juliana
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post #1 of 9 (permalink) Old 10-11-2019, 02:11 PM Thread Starter
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Service intervals

I have seen photos of the original Suzuki service manual on the Internet (actually this forum even I believe) and I own Hayne's Suzuki VanVan service manual.

I'm still fairly new to motorcycles and especially servicing them so after a couple years of owning RV200 I noticed that some things don't really match suggested service intervals.

For example, I have to adjust chain every 400-500 km while the Hayne's service manual suggests check/adjust every 1,000 km.

My air filter is still just like brand new after 8,000 km even though I ride about 30-40% off road and Hayne's recommends replacing it after 8,000 km.

My spark plug is also just like new, meeting gap specifications and visually it's in an almost perfect state.

Valve clearances were checked by a mechanic at the shop some 4,000+km ago and he was surprised to see them well within the specs. I want them to take a look again now but we were pretty sure that nobody had checked them at 4K interval before that one last time and yet they were in a very good state.

My front brake disc was in excellent state as well but I still replaced it as I wanted to ensure that all major components on this bike were new when I bought it second hand.

So, I noticed that the suggested service intervals can be drastically different. E.g. I may have to replace a spark plug and air filter way beyond 8,000 km. However, the chain needs more frequent servicing.

I'm asking myself now what else is different. What are the more realistic service intervals?

What is your experience? Any words of advice for the aspiring DIY motorcycle mechanic?
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post #2 of 9 (permalink) Old 10-11-2019, 05:54 PM
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simple...use the service schedule in the owners manual that came with your bike
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post #3 of 9 (permalink) Old 10-11-2019, 07:28 PM
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Hi Ivliv. I have owned a number of Suzukis and just had a look in the service manuals i have for my SV650, SV1000, and SG350. They are all pretty much the same. In other words the manuals are pretty generic and common sense would be a good way to go, tempered with the manual being used as a guide. We all use our bikes differently and in different conditions, the manual is trying to cover all bases perhaps

Some examples, the chain on VV200 is cheap junk and yes will need more frequent adjusting than the manual states. If your airfilter and plug look fine then leave them alone and ignore the manual. I tend to change oil far more frequently than the manual intervals.

I guess im saying follow the manual, especially in terms of the areas to be covered, but use it as a guide. I think you will soon develop your list of items to cover ( some not even in the manual), and when to do them
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post #4 of 9 (permalink) Old 10-12-2019, 03:01 PM
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I would definitely at least check stuff based on the mileage or time in the manual. I wouldn't necessarily change things, even if the manual says too, unless they look like they are close to needing it.
I would however, as you already seem to be doing, keep a close eye on the chain. I am at around 3100 miles and am almost out of adjustment for it.
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post #5 of 9 (permalink) Old 10-17-2019, 08:14 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EtniesFreak View Post
I would definitely at least check stuff based on the mileage or time in the manual. I wouldn't necessarily change things, even if the manual says too, unless they look like they are close to needing it.
I would however, as you already seem to be doing, keep a close eye on the chain. I am at around 3100 miles and am almost out of adjustment for it.
I too noticed that I'm quickly running out of adjustment.

There are apparently better (and more expensive) chains that can last longer and also stretch much slower.

I'm currently adjusting the chain tension every 300-500 km. I was told there are chains that can go unadjusted up to 1,000 km. I'm definitely upgrading to that type of chain once the OEM is done.
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post #6 of 9 (permalink) Old 10-18-2019, 02:22 AM
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I would suggest that you folks not adjust your drive chain TOO tight. Meaning, it is better to err on the side of being slightly loose, than to have it be slightly too tight.

Yes, these 520 chains on the Van Van can wear sooner than a quality 525 chain, but a lot of that excessive wear has to do with over-tightening the chain, and not lubing the chain.

Personally, I install a ScottOiler on ALL of my chain drive motorcycles, and it really pays off.
Second, I plan to replace the front and rear sprocket when this original chain is done, and install a 16 tooth front sprocket, and a 45 tooth rear sprocket, both in the 520 size, along with a quality 520 chain.

Example of experience: Last Summer, 2018, I rode my 2017 Suzuki V-Strom 650 XT, aka the Wee-3 XT, up to the Yukon, and Northwest Territories, up through Inuvik, and "almost" to TUK...Tuktoyaktuk, NWT.

On that ride of 5,800 miles, the drive chain started out from home with 3,200 miles on it, rode 5,800 miles on this trip, and arrived back home with 9,000 miles on the bike. During that 5,800 miles, I did NOT have to adjust the chain at all, not even one time, but I was also using a ScottOiler, on an O'ring chain, simply to keep a slight flim of lube between the chain and sprockets.

Years ago, on my wife's 2001 Honda Shadow 750 V-4 Magna, she got 10,000 miles out of the OEM chain and sprockets. When I replaced them all at 10,000, I installed the same brand and quality of chain and sprockets, but also installed a ScottOiler Touring model, with the larger reservoir.
That bike got 40,000 miles out of that second set of chain and sprockets, with the same rider doing all those miles...and the same mechanic doing all the adjustments.

I will predict that once I install thew 16 tooth front sprocket on our two Van Vans, and using the ScottOiler, we will see in "excess" of 20,000 miles on each of these bikes, while still using a 520 sized chain.
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post #7 of 9 (permalink) Old 10-18-2019, 04:32 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Flyin'Monkeys View Post
On that ride of 5,800 miles, the drive chain started out from home with 3,200 miles on it, rode 5,800 miles on this trip, and arrived back home with 9,000 miles on the bike. During that 5,800 miles, I did NOT have to adjust the chain at all, not even one time, but I was also using a ScottOiler, on an O'ring chain, simply to keep a slight flim of lube between the chain and sprockets.
That's incredible! However, did you actually measure chain slack at least every 1,000 km? I mean, with a ruler or a measurement tape.

I do it religiously, with a measurement tape, and the sad fact is this OEM chain stretches a lot and frequently. Roughly every 300-500 km. The chain is always clean and lubed too. I tend to go for 22-25 mm of slack, which is about in the middle of 20mm to 30mm slack range recommended by Haynes.
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post #8 of 9 (permalink) Old 10-18-2019, 07:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ILIV View Post
I do it religiously, with a measurement tape, and the sad fact is this OEM chain stretches a lot and frequently. Roughly every 300-500 km. The chain is always clean and lubed too. I tend to go for 22-25 mm of slack, which is about in the middle of 20mm to 30mm slack range recommended by Haynes.
But, having adjusted the chain, are you also then checking that there are no tight points ?
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post #9 of 9 (permalink) Old 10-18-2019, 09:15 AM Thread Starter
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But, having adjusted the chain, are you also then checking that there are no tight points ?
You bet! Always start by looking for the tightest spot and then adjust chain slack based off that. Then double-check the slack after tightening rear axle and letting the rear wheel spin a bit on the rear stand (or just push the bike around a little.. about 10 meters or so.. sometimes even drive a couple hundred meters).
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